“How to Immigrate to Canada”online course




I’m excited to announce the launch of How to Immigrate to Canada my 49-lectures online Udemy course.

How to Immigrate to Canada” course has been developed to assist International trained professionals like you to learn how you can become eligible to apply for Canadian Permanent Residency via the Express Entry System under the different immigration programs available In Canada and what you will require in order to begin your application.

This course includes a basic overview of the Express Entry system, the different eligible immigration programs, the required language and acceptance tests.
 It also covers some resources design to assist professional immigrants to navigate the Canadian labor market and secure employment.
By the end of this course, you will know some of the strategies and resources used in your immigration journey, job search in Canada and how to integrate into the Canadian labor market and start your new life in the True North.
The course covers the following themes:
·          How to be eligible for the different Canadian Immigration programs.
·          How to apply using the Express Entry system.
·          How to understand the accreditation procedure for your occupation in Canada.
·          How to integrate into the Canadian Labor Market and get a job.
·          How to implement Pre-arrival strategies.
·          How to use settlement services for better opportunities.
·          How to sponsor your family members.



This course is for internationally trained professionals with an intermediate level of English or French.
So take the course, tell your friends and send me some feedback, because I will be adding more material based on your feedback.

In celebration of the course’s launch, I’m offering up a limited time offer for the first 100 readers to enroll!
 Use the coupon code BONUS30-1 for a 70% discount on the original price.

 Not too shabby, right?!

This offer will only last till October 31st, 2018.

I’m looking forward to seeing how this goes, so don’t hesitate to holla back!

 And thank you in advance for your support and feedback!


What are you waiting for? Take my course now!


With jobs but no workers, Manitoba community recruits through provincial immigration program

One of Canada's 1st experiments to match foreign workers with specific jobs began 20 years ago.

Karen Pauls, Brett Purdy · CBC News · 

Skills Immigration & Express Entry BC Invitations Issued

The BC PNP has issued invitations to apply to qualified registrants in Skills Immigration and Express Entry BC categories. 

INVITATIONS TO APPLY

Periodically, we invite the highest scoring registrants in each category to apply to the BC Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP). We then nominate successful applicants to apply to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) for permanent residency.
This page shows the number of invitations issued.

Which categories require invitations?

We invite registrants in the following categories:
  • Skills Immigration — Skilled Worker
  • Skills Immigration — International Graduate
  • Skills Immigration — Entry Level and Semi-Skilled
  • Express Entry BC — Skilled Worker
  • Express Entry BC — International Graduate
  • Entrepreneur Immigration
HealthCare Professional and International Post-Graduate applicants under the Skills Immigration and Express Entry BC streams do not need an invitation to apply. Please apply directly via BCPNP Online.

For more information on the invitation and application process, please refer to the Skills Immigration and Express Entry BC Program Guide.

Canada and Australia Announce Amendment to Youth Mobility Arrangement

News release

Expanded age range will give young Canadians the opportunity to travel and work in Australia through the International Experience Canada program

August 28, 2018—Ottawa, ON
The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, and the Honourable Peter Dutton, Australia’s Minister for Home Affairs, today announced an agreement to expand the age range in the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between Canada and Australia concerning Youth Mobility. Through the amended MoU, Canadian and Australian young adults aged 18 to 35 will now be able to work and travel through the International Experience Canada (IEC) program.
Reflective of our strong people-to-people ties, Australia is a major source of foreign participants in IEC and Australia is consistently the top destination for Canadian youth through the program. Increasing the eligible age from 30 to 35 will provide for more opportunities for experienced professionals from both countries to gain valuable skills in a global work environment.
The IEC program facilitates the process for young people to gain valuable international work experience and travel abroad. There are 34 destinations available to young Canadians looking for international work experience with IEC’s partner countries and territories.

Quotes

“I am pleased that we have agreed to amend this MoU with Australia and further strengthen the great relationship between our two countries. International travel and work allows our youth to immerse themselves in a different culture and develop life skills, all while improving their employability back home. This expanded age range will give more young adults from Canada and Australia the opportunity to broaden their perspective of the world and gain professional work experience while traveling.”
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

Quick facts

  • IEC originated in 1965 as a cultural exchange between Canada and Germany. In 1967, following the success of the initiative, Canada proceeded to create an international travel and exchange program. More than 50 years later, Canada continues its commitment to fostering cultural exchanges between young people.
  • More than 200,000 Canadians have taken advantage of the work and travel experiences offered through the International Experience Canada program, and many return to Canada with life-changing experiences valuable to both their personal and professional lives.
  • There are three categories of participation under the program:
    1. Working Holiday participants receive open work permits that allow them to work anywhere in the host country, to support their travels.
    2. International Co-op participants receive employer-specific work permits that allow students to gain targeted experience in their field of study.
    3. Young Professionals participants receive an employer-specific work permit to gain targeted, professional work experience that is within their field of study or career path.
Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2018/08/canada-and-australia-announce-amendment-to-youth-mobility-arrangement.html

Virtual career fair connects international job seekers with Canadian employers


Fifteen hundred jobs, many of them in IT, will be up for grabs this month at the largest Virtual Career Expo to be held in Canada.
Over 50 employers from cities across Canada will be participating in the online job fair, which runs April 19 and 20. Companies like IBM, Pythian, Microsoft and the Bank of Montreal will be looking for highly-skilled technology workers from Canada and abroad.
The event is hosted by the International Talent Acquisition Centre (In-TAC) in partnership with Immigrant Services of Calgary and Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia. It’s also supported by the federal government.
“The IT sector is badly in need of top-notch talent that is not available here in Canada,” said Ying Xie, In-TAC’s Senior Manager. “We’re finding that this new way of recruiting people is very effective.”

Fixing the IT skills gap

More than 53% of organizations in Canada say that attracting and retaining skilled employees is one of their top challenges, according to a survey by the Information  and Communications Technology Council (ICTC)  The ICTC’s Labour Market Outlookindicates that Canada will need to fill 216,000 technology jobs by 2021. “This growing demand for ICT professionals is being created by transformative and rapid advancements of technology,” the ICTC says in the report.
To fix the IT skills gap, the ICTC recommends increased training for young people. However, due to Canada’s declining population, it says that immigrants will “play an increasingly pivotal role in addressing the digital talent shortage.” Currently, immigrants represent more than one-third of ICT workers in Canada. The ICTC proposes that Canada should develop policies and programs to make it easier for business to quickly hire international talent.
In November 2017, the federal government announced plans to help address the skills shortage by bringing 310,000 newcomers to Canada in 2018, growing to a total of 340,000 in 2020. “This historic multi-year immigration levels plan will benefit all Canadians because immigrants will contribute their talents to support our economic growth and innovation, helping to keep our country at the forefront of the global economy,” said  the Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

Get a job from home

The Virtual Career Expo website will give employers access to job applications from registered candidates from around the world. If they think there might be a match, the two can chat privately in a realistic 3-D environment that resembles an exhibition hall.  They can even conduct video interviews on the platform.
It’s a win for both sides, says Xie. For employers, it saves the costs of transportation and displays at on-site events. Job seekers can participate from the convenience of their device, without having to travel to crowded halls or wait in long lines to meet recruiters.
“We strongly encourage both parties to take advantage of this free opportunity to expand their staffing and job seeking strategies,” said Ying Xie, In-TAC’s Senior Manager. “Our hope is that employers will find the talent they are looking for with no additional costs, and that international talent will find jobs from the comfort of their homes overseas.”
Since it started in 2016, over 4000 international professionals from more than 80 countries have participated in the In-TAC Virtual Career Expo.
To register for the Virtual Career Expo, click here.
Source: https://newcanadians.tv/virtual-career-fair-connects-international-job-seekers-canadian-employers/

Canada: Top Five Reasons Why IT Companies Are Coming To Canada

Article by Green and Spiegel LLP

Canada is quickly becoming a hub for IT companies. Whether it is big and established companies or brand-new start-ups, the IT sector is booming. There are many reasons why IT companies want to do business in Canada. Here are five big reasons.
  1. Global Skills Strategy: Taking advantage of new work permit exemptions and two-week processing times, Canadian businesses are using this program to bring top talent from around the the world to their IT companies in Canada. The program was introduced in June of 2017 as part of the government's long-term plan to promote growth and innovation right here in Canada.
  2. Canada is a STEM Powerhouse: the province of Ontario alone has more STEM graduates than the entire state of California. But it's not only about numbers; Canada has some of the world's best universities and top IT programs. Did you know that the University of Waterloo is the top recruiting spot for Silicon Valley?
  3. Canada Invests in Innovation: in its budget for 2018, the Canadian Government announced new investments of almost $4 billion over five years to support Canadian research. The Government will support the work of more than 20,000 researchers and will invest more than $1.3 billion in labs and equipment. This is the largest investment in science and innovation that the Canadian Government has ever made.
  4. Canada is Open and Welcoming: Canada's diversity has earned it an exceptional reputation among business leaders. Good businesses know that companies with more diverse personnel outperform their competitors. A diverse workforce means more efficiency, innovation, and better responsiveness to client's needs. Diversity is why many are choosing to build their business right here in Canada. Did you know that more than half of Torontonians were not born in Canada?
  5. Uncertainty in the U.S.: since the Presidential Elections in 2016, there has been much speculation about the future of U.S. work visa programs, including the H1B visa which many IT companies rely on to bring workers. The uncertainty has made some IT companies downsize their operations in the U.S. and go elsewhere. Many have made use of the Global Skills Strategy to expand their Canadian operations.
This is an exciting time for the IT industry in Canada. Whether it is Canada's stable immigration system, diverse human resources, or thriving universities, there are plenty of reasons why IT companies are coming here.

Source:http://www.mondaq.com/canada/x/721230/work+visas/Top+Five+Reasons+Why+IT+Companies+Are+Coming+To+Canada

Announcing “How to immigrate to Canada as an IT professional”online course, Now on Udemy

I’m excited to announce the launch of How to Immigrate to Canada as an IT professional"  my 96-lecture online Udemy course.
How to Immigrate to Canada as an IT professionalonline course has been developed to assist International trained IT professionals like you to learn how you can become eligible to apply for Canadian Permanent Residency via the Express Entry System under the different immigration programs available In Canada and what you will require in order to begin your application.
This course includes a basic overview of the Express Entry system, the different eligible immigration programs, the required language and acceptance tests. It also covers some resources design to assist professional immigrants to navigate the Canadian labor market and secure employment.
By the end of this course, you will know some of the strategies and resources used in your immigration journey, job search in Canada and how to integrate into the Canadian labor market and start your new life in the True North.
The course covers the following themes:
  • How to be eligible for the different Canadian Immigration programs.
  • How to apply using the Express Entry system.
  • How to get your professional license as an IT professional in Canada.
  • How to understand the accreditation procedure for IT professionals in Canada.
  • How to integrate into the Canadian Labor Market and get a job.
  • How to implement Pre-arrival strategies.
  • How to use settlement services for better opportunities.
This course is for internationally trained engineers with an intermediate level of English or French.
So take the course, tell your friends and send me some feedback, because I will be adding more material based on your feedback.

In celebration of the course’s launch, I’m offering up a limited time offer for the first 100 readers to enroll!
 Use the coupon code BONUS100-2  for a 50% discount on the original price. Not too shabby, right?!
I’m looking forward to seeing how this goes, so don’t hesitate to holla back!
 And thank you in advance for your support and feedback!
What are you waiting for? Take my course now!

Top 10 In Demand Technology Careers in Canada.

by Sahra Togone


As the world becomes increasingly globalized, many countries are competing to attract and retain skilled workers to grow local economies. Since implementing a points-based system in the 1960s, the government of Canada has become a leader in transforming immigration. In 2015, the government introduced the Express Entry application process, which is a fast-track system designed to manage skilled immigrants settle in Canada.
In alignment with the federal system, several provinces across Canada have prioritized specific occupations for express entry through provincial nominee programs. The Ontario Express Entry: Human Capital Priorities stream has recently launched a list of National Occupational Classification (NOC) Codes for targeted occupations in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) sector. Like many provinces across Canada, Ontario is currently facing a human capital shortage in the tech sector, with thousands of local graduates failing to meet the demands of the growing economy.
Check our list below for more details about the top 10 technology careers in demand across Ontario:

  • Telecommunication Carriers ManagersTelecommunication carriers managers manage, organize, plan, and evaluate the processes of telecommunication institutions, units, and facilities. They analyze and assess telecommunication installation and maintenance services, and coordinate with internal and external companies to maintain efficient telecommunications system operations. To get hired as a telecommunications carriers manager, you will need to have a degree in electrical engineering or a related field. Most telecommunication carriers managers are usually employed by wired, wireless, or satellite telecommunication service providers.
  • Computer and Information Systems ManagersComputer and information systems (CIS) managers evaluate, control, plan, and organize the activities of organizations that administer computer and telecommunications software and information systems. CIS Managers can be found in almost all public and private organizations, including government offices, academic institutions, and nonprofit agencies. If you have a bachelor’s degree in computer science or computer engineering and you are highly organized, this could be the right job for you!
  • Electrical and Electronics EngineersElectrical and electronic engineers plan, design, research, and monitor electrical equipment and systems in a variety of settings. They are often employed in manufacturing, processing and transportation, communications technologies, electrical utility companies, and consulting firms. Although only a bachelor’ degree in electrical engineering is required, a master’s or doctoral degree in electrical engineering or a related field could add value to your résumé.
  • Computer EngineersComputer engineers conduct research, evaluate, design, and develop telecommunication hardware and information and communication system networks. Typically employed in engineering, manufacturing, telecommunication firms, educational, and research institutions, there are a variety of roles to fill within information technology departments in both private and public sectors organizations. A bachelor’s degree in computer engineering or a related degree in engineering physics or computer science is usually required by employers, and a master’s or doctoral degree can increase your chances of getting hired. Note, at this time, software engineers and designers are not included in this category for the purposes of the Ontario Provincial Nominee program.
  • Information Systems AnalystsInformation systems analysts and consultants analyze, develop, and implement information system development plans and provide guidance on how to develop information systems and system requirements. These professionals are often employed in information technology firms within the private and public sectors. Most employers prefer hiring candidates who have successfully completed a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related discipline.
  • Database AnalystsDatabase analysts design and analyze data management software. They are often employed in information technology departments in either private or public organizations and manage databases for information systems projects. Database analysts are often employed in information technology units within private and public sectors and consulting firms. A bachelor’s degree in computer science is normally required or a degree in a related field such as mathematics.
  • Software Engineers and DesignersSoftware engineers and designers create and integrate software applications, operating systems, and embedded software information into business processes. They are usually employed by development firms in the private and public sector, including government and nonprofit organizations. A bachelor’s degree in computer science, computer systems, software engineering or mathematics is usually required.
  • Computer Programmers and Interactive Media DevelopersComputer programmers and interactive media developers write and revise software code. Computer programmers maintain existing computer programs by modifying and identifying technical problems and providing solutions, while interactive media developers are responsible for programming animation software, and special effects software for film and video applications. These roles are often employed by information technology consulting firms, information technology units within private and public sectors, and startup and technology ventures. A bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related degree such as computer systems engineering, software engineering, and mathematics is usually required by employers.
  • Web Designers and DevelopersWeb designers and developers research, design, and maintain Internet and Intranet sites. Working in private and public organizations, they liaise with clients as website architects. Web designers and developers are often employed by computer software development firms and advertising agencies. A bachelor’s degree in either computer science or communications and business studies, or the completion of a college program in computer science, graphic arts, web design or business is typically required by employers.
  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and TechniciansElectrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians provide technical support services in the development, testing, and operation of electrical and electronic equipment and systems. Technologists and technicians are usually employed in electrical utility companies by manufacturers of electrical/electronic equipment, consulting firms or communication firms. A two or three-year college program in electrical or electronics engineering is usually required by employers. A certification in electrical or electronics engineering technology from a provincial association of engineering may be required and can often increase your chances in getting hired.
Source: https://www.wes.org/advisor-blog/top-10-demand-technology-careers/?utm_campaign=wesa&utm_source=newsletter_biweekly_jobseeker_2018-05-28&utm_medium=email&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTkdNeE1qWXdPVE0wTkdFNSIsInQiOiJWWEpCUlVabGxcL0xKNXlIaXNVZWRKd1RZamU2OE9YTyt5STFxcnM4ODhtVStWVk5wdXpMVU9cL1N3a3dydkJ5bmlzWDNVQ1VoVFI0OEliK3FTYXZteHR4UFJNTWpFZXA1N2ZtMnpDYXAyVTdtVTJuU3RWQTZPNG8rcG1wYVRLNTFvIn0%3D

Join the Thunderclap here:https://www.thunderclap.it/…/69744-how-to-immigrate-to-cana…
Part of the How to immigrate to Canada online course series.
You can also visit our website at http://www.nexuscanadaimmigration.com/Default.aspx







The Benefits of Being Bilingual: French Literacy in Canada

by Sigrid Roman
As a country with two official languages, Canada offers many opportunities for skilled immigrants who are proficient in English and French. Being able to communicate well in either language is vital in order to succeed in Canada. Being able to communicate well in both languages is better, and gives you a competitive edge over someone who speaks only one language.

The French Language

In 1867, French became one of the two languages in Canada that could be used in parliamentary debates as well as any Canadian court established under the Constitution Act. Its official status was later confirmed in 1969 under the first Official Languages  Act which ensured that every Canadian would have access to federal services in the official language—English or French—of their choice.
Since then, numerous events and policies have continued to frame the French language as a fundamental and important characteristic of Canadian identity. The most notable is the Constitution of 1982 which clearly states the importance of language rights in the Canadian Charter of Rights of Freedoms. French, it would seem, is here to stay.

Nearly 10 Million Canadians Speak French

According to Statistics Canada’s 2011 Census of Population, approximately 10 million people reported being able to speak in French. Of these, 7.9 million people reported they speak French at home on a regular basis.
In recent years, there has been a slight decline in Canada of Canadians (outside of Quebec) who are fluent in French. However, with a strong government mandate, and companies continually seeking employees who are able to communicate in both English and French, there are still many reasons why you should consider improving or marketing your French language skills in Canada.
  • Benefit # 1: It’s good for business: New Brunswick, one of the francophone regions of Canada, reports that its bilingual workforce has been a key reason why it has attracted big corporate players. As a result, being bilingual might be a key reason why you have a better chance of being hired in bilingual organizations.
  • Benefit # 2: Being bilingual increases your opportunities in your job search: Statistically speaking, knowing more than one language increases the options you have within the job market. Whether it is because the workplace needs someone who can get into contact with a certain community or they have a special need for language-based service (i.e., interpretation and translation services), your French skills can become important in such situations.
  • Benefit # 3: You can work in French-speaking parts of Canada. Relocating from a city in Canada that you’ve already settled in may not be an easy choice but there are opportunities to consider that may not only improve your job prospects, but also your quality of life. Speaking French will give you the freedom to work anywhere in Canada.
  • Benefit # 4: You get paid more: If by any chance, you have found your bilingual opportunity, chances are you are paid more for it. As this Globe and Mail article points out:
    “[Canadian] men who know both languages earn an average income 3.8% higher than those who know English only. Bilingual women earn 6.6% more.”
  • Benefit # 5: Being bilingual is better for your brain: The ability to speak more than one language is true for many skilled immigrants who settle in Canada. It is important to cultivate that ability, not only for the reasons listed above but also because it might actually be good for your brain. As stated in this Guardian article:
    “A superior ability to concentrate, solve problems and focus are, of course, valuable in everyday life. But perhaps the most exciting benefit of bilingualism occurs in ageing, when executive function typically declines: bilingualism seems to protect against dementia.”
If you speak other languages in addition to English, you are off to a great start already.

For all of the benefits listed above, and more, consider adding French as one of your professional languages. Doing so will expand the possibilities of your career path in Canada.


Source: https://www.wes.org/advisor-blog/being-french-bilingual-in-canada/?utm_campaign=wesa&utm_source=newsletter_biweekly_jobseeker_2018-05-28&utm_medium=email&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTkdNeE1qWXdPVE0wTkdFNSIsInQiOiJWWEpCUlVabGxcL0xKNXlIaXNVZWRKd1RZamU2OE9YTyt5STFxcnM4ODhtVStWVk5wdXpMVU9cL1N3a3dydkJ5bmlzWDNVQ1VoVFI0OEliK3FTYXZteHR4UFJNTWpFZXA1N2ZtMnpDYXAyVTdtVTJuU3RWQTZPNG8rcG1wYVRLNTFvIn0%3D

Food Service Supervisor




Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada · Food Service Supervisor · 6311

DESCRIPTION

We are looking for a professional Food Service Supervisor to be responsible for managing all F& B operations and for delivering an excellent guest experience. The successful candidate will be able to forecast, plan and manage all F&B orders, staff, and finance. The goal is to maximize sales and revenue through customer satisfaction and employee engagement.

  • Skills/Duties
    • Address customers' complaints or concerns;
    • Train staff in job duties, sanitation and safety procedures;
    • Establish methods to meet work schedules;
    • Supervise and co-ordinate activities of staff who prepare and portion food;
    • Prepare food order summaries for cooks, and customers;
    • Prepare and submit reports;
    • Maintain records of stock, repairs, sales, and wastage;
    • Establish work schedules;
    • Estimate and order ingredients and supplies;
    • Ensure food service and quality control.

    Work Setting
    • Brand Food Service establishment;

    Workers Supervised
    • Kitchen and food service helpers;
    • Food and beverage servers;
    • Cook (general)

REQUIREMENTS

  • Work Site Environment
    • Noisy; Odours; Hot
    Work Conditions and Physical Capabilities
    • Work under pressure;
    • Combination of sitting, standing, walking;
    • Standing for extended periods
    Ability to Supervise
    • Staff in various areas of responsibility; 5-10 people
    Personal Suitability:
    • Effective interpersonal skills;
    • Team player;
    • Excellent oral communication
    Education
    • Completion of secondary school is usually required.
    • Completion of a community college program in food service administration, hotel and restaurant management or related discipline
      or
    • 1 year to less than 2 years of experience in food preparation or service are required.

BENEFITS

  • Starting wage: 14 CAD/ hour
  • This is a full-time job with minimum 40 hours per week
  • Length of Contract: Permanent

For more information send us your resume to nexuscanadavisa@gmail.com

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